ADOPT AN AIRPLANE

The Officers and Board of Trustees invite you to consider adopting a plane with the Empire State Aerosciences Museum!

Airplane adoption is perfect for Non-profit Groups ( Veterans, Scouts, Clubs), Civil Air Patrol, Local businesses, and Individuals.

By adopting an airplane you, your business or your group are committing yourselves to (1)  wash the airplane at least once a year and (2) do some painting on the airplane. You will do the

work in the museum’s Air Park under the direction of an ESAM

Restoration Crew member sometime when the weather is warm. You will be given free admission to the museum when you work on the adopted airplane and ESAM will post a sign indicating that you have adopted the airplane. If you or your group are interested in adopting an airplane at ESAM, please contact the office at 518-377-2191, extension 10.

Here are some of the details. Work will be performed under the direction of a member of the ESAM Restoration Crew. Museum liability insurance will cover you while working on the airplane. ESAM will provide all needed supplies. Volunteers will not be allowed to climb on the airplanes. Annual fees are $50 for individuals and non-profit groups, and $200 for businesses.

For more information, please call the esam office at (518) 377-2191 ext 10 or email us your question at esam.office@gmail.com

Feel free to check out our planes below!

Concorde Model

Concorde Model

Adopted by Alfonzo DiBlasio

Lockheed C-130 Hercules (Credible Sport)

Lockheed C-130 Hercules (Credible Sport)

Adopted by Dave Tripp The Lockheed LC-130 is a ski-equipped U. S. Air Force variant of the C-130 Hercules used in the Arctic and Antarctic, and ten are currently in service with the 109th Airlift Wing of the New York Air National Guard, based at Stratton Air Base adjacent to ESAM. The skis are retracted above the wheels for conventional runways, and retracted below the wheels for operations from snow-covered landing areas.

Convair F-102A Delta Dagger

Convair F-102A Delta Dagger

The F-102 Delta Dagger, known universally as the “Deuce”, was a single-engine interceptor in service with the U.S. Air Force’s Air Defense Command, charged with defending America from Soviet bombers during the Cold War. The F-102 entered operational service in 1956, and was the first American fighter to feature a delta wing. As one of the most complex fighters developed, it would be guided to its target by radar, and was armed with six air-to-air missiles. The F-102 had a top speed of 825 mph.

Supermarine Scimitar

Supermarine Scimitar

Adopted by Michael The Scimitar was a single-seat, twin engine, carrier-based strike fighter used by Great Britain's Fleet Air Arm, which first flew in 1954, and was intended to serve as a multi-role fighter, able to conduct interception, ground attack, and reconnaissance missions. When it entered operational service in 1958, it was, for its day, a high performance aircraft and somewhat ahead of its time.

Republic F-105G Thunderchief

Republic F-105G Thunderchief

Adopted by Mitch & Garren The F-105 Thunderchief was one of the most legendary planes of the Vietnam era, and is the largest single-engine plane ever used by U.S. forces. With its small wing area and powerful Pratt and Whitney J-75 turbojet, the F-105 could attain Mach 1 speeds at sea level and Mach 2 at 30,000 feet. The F-105 entered operational service in 1958, and when production ended in 1964, over 800 had been delivered to the Air Force.

Vought A-7E Corsair

Vought A-7E Corsair

Adopted by The McArthur Family The A-7 was a sub-sonic light attack bomber developed initially for the Navy, but also adopted by the Air Force. The A-7 enjoyed one of the fastest and most trouble-free developments in modern aviation history, having entered operational service with the Navy in late 1966, only three years after initiation of its design, and with the Air Force shortly thereafter.

Republic F-84F Thunderstreak

Republic F-84F Thunderstreak

Adopted by Northeastern NY Chapter of IPMS/USA The Thunderstreak was a swept-wing derivative of the F-84 Thunderjet, developed by Republic in 1949, hoping to achieve higher performance, comparable to that of the North American F-86 Sabre. The plane had a maximum speed of 695 mph, and armament consisted of six internally mounted .50 caliber machine guns, as well as up to 6,000 lbs. of bombs and rockets on external pylons.

North American T-2 Buckeye

North American T-2 Buckeye

Adopted by Kevin Millington The T-2 was the Navy's first jet-powered dedicated trainer, and was used to introduce naval aviators to jets. Since entering operational service in 1959, virtually every naval aviator trained on the T-2. The T-2 was eventually retired from the Navy in 2005, having gradually been replaced by the high performance T-45 Goshawk.

Northrup F-5E Tiger

Northrup F-5E Tiger

Adopted by Karl Groves & Grandchildren The F-14 is a twin-engine, two-seat supersonic fighter designed in the 1970s for fleet defense and air superiority. With a maximum takeoff weight of 72,900 lbs. and a complex electronics and weapons suite, it was one of the largest and most complex fighters ever built. The Tomcat is distinguished by its variable swept wings, which provide it with optimal high and low-speed performance. The Tomcat was prominently featured in the 1986 film Top Gun.

North American RA-5C Vigilante

North American RA-5C Vigilante

Adopted by Raymond Davis The Vigilante was designed during the 1950s as a two-seat, carrier-based heavy attack bomber solely for the nuclear strike mission. First flown in 1958, the Vigilante was extremely advanced and featured numerous innovative features, and was also one of the largest and most powerful planes ever operated from an aircraft carrier, able to achieve a top speed of Mach 2.1.

Fairchild A-10Thunderbolt II( Warthog)

Fairchild A-10Thunderbolt II( Warthog)

Adopted by Schenectady Composite Squadron - Civilian Air Patrol The A-10, known universally as the 'Warthog’, was developed after the Vietnam War in response to the need for aircraft dedicated to the close air support role, missions involving attacking ground targets in close proximity to friendly forces. In 1976, the A-10 entered operational service with the Air Force as the only plane developed specifically for close air support missions.

Grumman F-14 Tomcat

Grumman F-14 Tomcat

Adopted by Gary Davis, Lawrence Wilder & Cameron Garufi The F-14 is a twin-engine, two-seat supersonic fighter designed in the 1970s for fleet defense and air superiority. With a maximum takeoff weight of 72,900 lbs. and a complex electronics and weapons suite, it was one of the largest and most complex fighters ever built. The Tomcat is distinguished by its variable swept wings, which provide it with optimal high and low-speed performance.

McDonnell F-101B Voodoo

McDonnell F-101B Voodoo

Adopted by Andrea Barnard The F-101 Voodoo entered service with the U.S. Air Force in 1958 and was the largest fighter of its time. It was an icon of the Cold War, guarding the U.S. against Soviet bombers, armed with the first generation air-to-air missiles. The Voodoo was fast, with a top speed of Mach 1.8 (1,500 mph); had a range of over 1,800 miles; and featured an armament of four air-to-air missiles, including the AIR-2 Genie, equipped with a nuclear air-blast warhead.

McDonnell-Douglas F-4 Phantom

McDonnell-Douglas F-4 Phantom

Adopted by Jeff Smith & Christina Shepley The F-4 was designed during the 1950s as a carrier-based interceptor for the Navy and subsequently evolved into one of the most powerful, versatile, and numerous American fighters since World War II, and served as the standard tactical fighter for the Navy, Air Force, and Marine Corps during the 1960s, ‘70, and ‘80s. With two GE J-79 turbojet engines, the F-4 became one of the most powerful and heaviest fighters of its day.

Mikoyan-Gurevich MiG-21 Fishbed

Mikoyan-Gurevich MiG-21 Fishbed

Adopted by Michael Dreibelbis The MiG-21 (NATO name 'Fishbed') is one of the most successful fighters of all time and holds the record as the most prolifically built combat aircraft since World War II, with over 10,600 manufactured. Following its introduction into service with the Soviet Air Force in 1959, it was subsequently supplied to nearly 50 foreign air arms in a variety of progressively improved variants.

Mikoyan-Gurevich MiG-17 Fresco

Mikoyan-Gurevich MiG-17 Fresco

Adopted by Rachelle Meerschaert The MiG-17 (NATO name ‘Fresco’) was a direct descendant of the Korean War-era MiG-15 and went on to become one of the most prolifically built and widely exported fighters in history. Since entering operational service in 1952 with the Soviet Air Force, over 10,000 were produced and exported to 30 countries. Like most Soviet fighters, the MiG-17 was ruggedly built, easy to manufacture, and able to operate from primitive runways.

Mikoyan-Gurevich MiG-15

Mikoyan-Gurevich MiG-15

Adopted by Northeastern NY Chapter of IPMS/USA The MiG-15 was the first successful Soviet fighter, and entered service in 1949, being one of the first jets to feature a swept wing, which helped give it a maximum speed of 660 mph. The MiG-15 was one of the most prolifically built fighters in history, with nearly 18,000 manufactured. The MiG-15 is closely associated with the Korean War, in which it served with the Red Chinese Air Force.

Grumman S-2 Tracker

Grumman S-2 Tracker

Adopted by Marc Platt The S-2F was designed in the early 1950s as the first purpose-built anti-submarine warfare aircraft capable of performing both detection and attack roles. The Tracker utilized sonobuoys; a Magnetic Anomaly Detector boom; and a searchlight to detect enemy submarine; along with torpedoes, rockets, and depth charges for attack.

Grumman A-6E Intruder

Grumman A-6E Intruder

Adopted by Albany Senior Squadron - Civil Air Patrol The A-6 is a twin-engine, two seat, carrier-based attack bomber used by the Navy and Marine Corps and was unique in its ability to accurately deliver a heavy bomb load over long distances at night or in all-weather conditions. ESAM’s A-6 was built in 1967 by Grumman on Long Island, and enjoyed a long career with the Navy; participated in the Vietnam War; and was deployed aboard the carriers USS America, Nimitz, Saratoga, and Forrestal.

Douglas F3-D Skyknight

Douglas F3-D Skyknight

Adopted by the Macherone Family The F-3D Skyknight is a two-seat, twin-engine fighter, which entered service in 1952. Originally intended to serve with the Navy aboard aircraft carriers, the F-3D instead equipped Marine Corps units from land bases. Equipped with one of the first airborne search radars, the Skyknight was able to intercept enemy aircraft at night using its APQ-35 search radar, housed in its nose, which featured over 300 vacuum tubes.

Hughes OH-6 Cayuse

Hughes OH-6 Cayuse

Adopted by P. Quantock *currently in hangar*

Bell UH-1 Iroquis (Huey)

Bell UH-1 Iroquis (Huey)

Adopted by the Lazarus Family Known universally as the Huey, the UH-1 was the first great American helicopter, and an icon of the Vietnam War. ESAM’s Huey was built in 1964 and was used as an attack helicopter in Vietnam.

Douglas A-4 Skyhawk

Douglas A-4 Skyhawk

Adopted by Marisa Dreibelbis The A-4, or "Scooter," is unique for its compact size, and bears more of a resemblance to a fighter than a bomber. The A-4 entered operational service in 1956, and when production ended in 1979, nearly 3,000 examples in 17 different versions had been delivered to the Navy, Marine Corps, and various foreign countries. At the height of its deployment during the Vietnam War, aircraft carrier air wings typically included two 12-plane attack squadrons of A-4s.